Crackle in the Shield

Many people that I chat with have taken to the act of “cord cutting”. Getting rid of one’s cable service, and relying entirely on online streaming. I see the benefits, but the act of television viewing goes beyond the watching. Flipping is a main cog in the TV experience. I really enjoy aimless wandering around the dial. Often getting lost during shows I’m watching to meander around my vast cable package. I really couldn’t tell you how many channels I have. It’s in the 300 range, but some of those are just music feeds and/or Greek news. Continue reading

Email Roundtable #51: TV in Fits and Spurts, or what we watch when we are busy

Kerri and Jane attempt to discuss how they fill their down-time during busy times.

Jane: So, full disclosure, Kerri and I are both fully immersed and crazily busy with the Winnipeg Fringe Festival. Obviously, we still have time for TV; meaning we have some things to say this week. We’ve discovered that both of us turn to cooking shows during those hectic, busy days when we have a bit of time to ourselves. Kerri, why are cooking shows so important to your down-time and what are the favourites that you rely on? Continue reading

A Great Little “Catastrophe”: Channel 4’s charming show about life’s best mistakes

“Fully Formed Human Beings”. That’s what my co-worker Sandra calls them. You might know them better as adults. Those people who have lived long enough to know that they really don’t know anything and ask the right questions and probably worked a shitty job dealing with the public at some point in their lives. People who know when they are feeling like crap and why they are feeling like crap (probably because they haven’t eaten) and when they are happy and why they are happy (probably because they have eaten). When I was a kid adults always seemed like they had a script and knew exactly the right lines to say at all times. But, of course, they didn’t. They were messing up just like I was. Because, really, when can we say we are fully formed? When can we say we’ve stopped growing and changing and learning and fucking up? Sometimes it feels like adulthood is just a series of awful mistakes. Continue reading

Dropped The Ball

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When word came that Ballers was coming to HBO, I was pretty damn stoked. Game of Thrones isn’t for me. It’s about wizards, right? – Just not my bag. The Newsroom was so ham-handed that I lost interest. Those other HBO offerings never got me excited, But Ballers! I mean – its Ballers! Let’s throw together things I really like and produce it slickly. Good job, HBO. Continue reading

Email Roundtable #50 Jane makes Kerri watch Parenthood

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This week Jane attempts to convince Kerri that the NBC drama Parenthood is the perfect show for her.

Jane: Parenthood is my show. I know we could be round-tabling about the brilliant last episode of Community or the crazy-butt-crazy things happening on Hannibal (or not happening, I can’t tell,) but those shows haven’t been consuming my TV life in the same way. I want them to consume Kerri’s life too. If there is one thing I know, Kerri will love this show as much as I do. Kerri, you need to watch this show and you need to start soon because I really, REALLY need to talk to you about it! To get down to basics, I know you will love this show because it is about good people. They are flawed people sure, but they are trying to do what’s best for the people they love. What I think creator/writer Jason Katims does so well is present and perfect tired TV clichés (a son with a disease that makes him different, grown children moving back home, balancing work and family life) in new and surprising ways. Katims reveals many sides and corners to previously one-note stories by populating Parenthood with well-intentioned characters and not passing judgement on them. Life is hard and everyone is trying to do the right thing. I think as a lover of good people and creative melodrama, you will fall deeply in love with this show. I really do. I know you’ve seen the pilot. What were your initial thoughts?

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A Rave Review of The Pinkertons

The Pinkertons

For the second week in a row, the Golden Age of Television is reviewing a mystery. The title of this article could be, “Guys! Something Shot in Manitoba is ACTUALLY REALLY GOOD!” or, “I Never Thought I’d Like a First-Run-Syndicated Detective Procedural Set in 1880’s Kansas” or, “If You’re Looking For A Show To Watch With Literally Any Family Member, The Pinkertons Is It.”

Set in post-civil war, pre-prohibition era America, The Pinkertons takes place in the Wild West, where all of the drinking, shooting and gambling requires the constant presence of sheriffs, US marshalls and detectives. The Pinkerton Detective Agency sets up shop in Kansas City, where there are plenty of murders to go around and money to be made by solving them.  Continue reading

A Letter to the Creators of Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries, with Disclaimer

DISCLAIMER: Netflix has been monitoring my email and due to my importance as a customer, they’ve immediately added Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries to Canadian Netflix as of June 1, 2015. 

To the creators of Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries,

I am writing to you today because I love your show. I love watching the adventures and exploits of Phryne Fisher (played with unwavering pizzazz by Essie Davis), solving mysteries while impeccably dressed in jazz-soaked 1920’s Australia. I love that Phryne is independently wealthy and just decides one day that detective work would be fun. I love that Phryne is a collector of people, like Bert and Cec, the drivers/working class thugs/dock workers (I really don’t know how they earn their keep); or Dot, the timid and shy young woman who becomes Phryne’s maid/confidant; or the Little Orphan Annie-type kid that Phryne adopts who disappears for long stretches whenever convenient to the plot; or the many, many men that come in and out of Phryne’s life and bed. All of whom Phryne uses to help her solve mysteries. It is the perfect show to watch during the summer months and, since we are finally having a semblance of warm weather here in the arctic tundra known as Winnipeg, I’ve been devouring the first season. The show is fluffy and fizzy and feminist and I love it. Almost everything you need to know about the show can be summed up by this promotional photograph:

About

YES.

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